House to vote Wednesday on sending articles of impeachment to Senate

The House will vote Wednesday to send impeachment articles to the Senate, Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiClinton says Zuckerberg has 'authoritarian' views on misinformation Trump defense team signals focus on Schiff Trump legal team offers brisk opening defense of president MORE (D-Calif.) told Democrats Tuesday morning, according to multiple Democrats.

Pelosi did not announce at Tuesday morning's House Democratic Caucus meeting which lawmakers will serve as prosecutors — also known as impeachment managers — in the Senate trial.

But the resolution slated to hit the House floor on Wednesday is expected to name the impeachment managers.

“The American people deserve the truth, and the Constitution demands a trial," Pelosi said in a statement confirming the Wednesday vote to send the articles of impeachment and name managers. “The President and the Senators will be held accountable.”

The resolution will get ten minutes of floor debate before receiving a vote, which is expected to largely fall along party lines.

The vote will come exactly four weeks after the House passed two articles of impeachment accusing Trump of abusing his power for pressuring the Ukrainian government to open investigations into his political opponents and obstructing Congress during Democrats' inquiry by defying subpoenas for witness testimony and documents.

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House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffSunday shows preview: Lawmakers prepare for week two of impeachment trial Trump defense team signals focus on Schiff Schiff pushes back: Defense team knows Trump is guilty MORE (D-Calif.) and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerTrump defense team signals focus on Schiff Impeachment has been a dud for Democrats Nadler calls Trump a 'dictator' on Senate floor MORE (D-N.Y.) are widely expected to serve as managers, as well as other members of their committees.

Other names floated include Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinHouse Oversight committee asks DHS for information on family separation Maryland Rep. Raskin endorses Warren ahead of Iowa caucus Congressional Progressive Caucus co-chair Jayapal endorses Sanders MORE (D-Md.) and House Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesJeffries, Nadler showcase different NY styles in Trump trial Hakeem Jeffries tells Senate in impeachment proceedings they should subpoena Baseball Hall of Fame after Jeter vote Video becomes vital part of Democrats' case against Trump MORE (D-N.Y.). Both declined to say on Tuesday if they would be serving as impeachment managers.

"It's my expectation - though it's the Speaker's call and we have complete confidence in her - that Chairman Schiff and Chairman Nadler will play a prominent role in carrying the message over in the Senate," Jeffries said.

Pelosi had withheld the articles from the Senate in an effort to pressure Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSchumer: Trump's team made case for new witnesses 'even stronger' Trump, Democrats risk unintended consequences with impeachment arguments CNN's Axelrod says impeachment didn't come up until 80 minutes into focus group MORE (R-Ky.) to agree to terms for an impeachment trial, including whether witnesses can be called.

McConnell has so far refused to budge, arguing that any decisions on witnesses should come after both sides make opening arguments in the trial.

Against that backdrop, Democrats have been virtually unanimous in supporting Pelosi's strategy to delay sending the articles, while the spotlight has shone on Senate GOP leaders and the rules that will govern the trial.

They're pushing for the Senate to call witnesses that refused to testify during the House impeachment inquiry, including former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonRomney: 'It's very likely I'll be in favor of witnesses' in Trump impeachment trial George Conway: Witness missing from impeachment trial is Trump Democrats see Mulvaney as smoking gun witness at Trump trial MORE and acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyDemocrats see Mulvaney as smoking gun witness at Trump trial Trump legal team offers brisk opening defense of president Trump legal team launches impeachment defense MORE.

Bolton announced earlier this month that he would be willing to testify in the Senate impeachment trial if he is subpoenaed, despite ignoring an initial demand for his testimony from House Democrats late last year.

"What we were focused on here was a fair trial, just talking about what the process would be for a fair trial and making sure the American people hear the full truth," said Rep. Ann KusterAnn McLane KusterHouse to vote Wednesday on sending articles of impeachment to Senate Cast and crew of 'Unbelievable' join lawmakers to advocate for reducing DNA, rape kit backlog House Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment MORE (D-N.H.).

The announcement arrives as numerous House Democrats have been jockeying for the coveted spot of impeachment manager — a prominent position that can raise a national profile in an instant.

Rep. Richard NealRichard Edmund NealKey House committee chairman to meet with Mnuchin on infrastructure next week Coalition of conservative groups to air ads against bipartisan proposal to end 'surprise' medical bills House revives agenda after impeachment storm MORE (D-Mass.), chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, was not among the lawmakers seeking a manager role. But he said those on the front lines of the investigation — particularly lawmakers on the Intelligence and Judiciary committees — are obvious choices to assume the position.

"They're the ones who, obviously, should proceed," he said.

The Senate trial is expected to begin in the coming days once the House sends over the articles of impeachment. But senators will have to attend to some housekeeping items before the substance of the trial begins, meaning opening arguments likely won't begin until after the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday next week.

The Senate must first pass a resolution informing the House that it is ready to receive the articles of impeachment. The impeachment managers will then physically walk from the House chamber to the Senate to formally deliver the articles of impeachment.

Next, the Senate will have to adopt a rule package outlining procedures for the trial. Each senator will also have to take a special oath for the trial to “do impartial justice according to the Constitution and laws."

--This report was updated at 11:54 a.m.